What’s with the image descriptions on my social media posts? – Carly Findlay Blog (May 2018)

A white-haired visually impaired man on a park bench wearing headphones and holding a smart phone.

Do you have a social media account? Then this blog post is for you!

First up, a quick mea culpa,  we are very consciously included alt-text with all the images on our website.  We do so consciously because as a disability service/website we passionately believe in the premise that the web should be inclusive and respectful.  Providing alt-text is a great way to flag to your site impaired visitors what the image on your site is about.  Where we have fallen down is that we often forget to include that tag in our social media posts.  That step up ends now, we will forthwith strive to include those tags in our posts.  Once we have a little money, we want to loop back to our animated videos to ensure they have appropriate embedded text in all our videos.

What’s with the image descriptions on my socials?

You might have noticed I’ve recently made a big effort to do image descriptions on my photos on social media. Wait! Are you even following me on social media?!

Pause…

Instagram | Facebook | Twitter | LinkedIn

…Recommence!

I describe what the photo looks like in each post.

Why?

They’re for people who can’t see the image – they might use a screen reader (reads out text to them) or just want the image described.

I used to do this in my old comms job at a disability NFP, but wasn’t doing it on my own social media. I realised that my audience probably needs image descriptions and I want to be a good ally to people with different accessibility needs. Plus, I talk about access in my work so I really do need to walk the talk. So I have really been trying. Usually I’m straight forward but sometimes I’m cheeky and add some humour into it.

First up, a quick mea culpa,  we are very consciously included alt-text with all the images on our website.  We do so consciously because as a disability service/website we passionately believe in the premise that the web should be inclusive and respectful.  Providing alt-text is a great way to flag to your site impaired visitors what the image on your site is about.  Where we have fallen down is that we often forget to include that tag in our social media posts.  That step up ends now, we will forthwith strive to include those tags in our posts.  Once we have a little money, we want to loop back to our animated videos to ensure they have appropriate embedded text in all our videos.

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