Almost Half of Business Leaders Believe There Aren’t Enough Candidates with A Disability Despite Over 1 M Disabled People Wanting to Work – Valuable 500 (Paul Polman | February 2022)

Employer refuses the disabled person in a wheelchair to employ him for work. The concept of discrimination and inequality for people with disabilities

London, 3 Feb: Global business collective, the Valuable 500, today announces new research showing that almost half of businesses believe that a key barrier to the recruitment and retention of disabled employees is the lack of candidates.

From the platform’s perspective, this landscape is why we are so passionate about disability entrepreneurship.

How often have we heard this lament over the last 100 years, We want to hire more women, people of colour, sexually non-binary people or people with a disability but they aren’t applying and if they do they aren’t qualified.

We need a change to culture, mentoring and attitudes. We believe the answer is helping people who live with a disability to establish their own money-generating endeavour.

This contrasts evidence from government figures showing that there are one million disabled people in the UK who want to and can work but are being denied the opportunity.  The data, highlighted by Virgin Media and Scope with their ground-breaking campaign – ‘Work with Me’ was supported by an Opinium survey of 2,000 disabled people which found that when applying for jobs only half of applications result in an interview, compared with 69% for non-disabled applicants. 2021 Government figures show that the disability employment gap sits at 28.4%, a decrease year on the year by just 0.7%. This shows a clear need for a shift away from misconceptions and taboos in recruitment.

One major factor behind the lack of job candidates with disabilities could be attributed to lack of representation of disability inclusion.   Whilst there has been a growing awareness in the past year, it still doesn’t have its deserved share of voice in the broader business agenda.  It is often a forgotten aspect in this conversation – particularly when it comes to business leadership where just 4% of CEOs have a disclosed disability. The Valuable 500 is working to tackle this critical issue by promoting better ‘story telling’ by business leaders with first-hand experience of disability.

Disabled people bring immense contribution to business and society as a whole, making up 15% of the global population, they bring diversity of thought, lived experience and a wealth of talent, all vital for the business sustainability agenda.

The Adecco Group, based in Zurich, Switzerland, is the world’s second largest Human Resources provider and temporary staffing firm and a member of the Valuable 500.

At Adecco, we intend to make the future work for everyone, and we really mean it. We have developed a sound culture of inclusion that enforces integration in the workplace for persons with disabilities across all our markets. We started this inclusion journey back in 1986, and are really proud of contributing to significant changes in both lives of individuals and mindsets. With perseverance, we demonstrate every day that persons with disabilities are reliable, skilled and talented individuals with the potential to belong fully to the world of work in all industries and types of positions.

CHRISTOPHE CATOIR, PRESIDENT OF ADECCO

London, 3 Feb: Global business collective, the Valuable 500, today announces new research showing that almost half of businesses believe that a key barrier to the recruitment and retention of disabled employees is the lack of candidates. This contrasts evidence from government figures showing that there are one million disabled people in the UK who want to and can work but are being denied the opportunity.  The data, highlighted by Virgin Media and Scope with their ground-breaking campaign – ‘Work with Me’ was supported by an Opinium survey of 2,000 disabled people which found that when applying for jobs only half of applications result in an interview, compared with 69% for non-disabled applicants. 2021 Government figures show that the disability employment gap sits at 28.4%, a decrease year on the year by just 0.7%. This shows a clear need for a shift away from misconceptions and taboos in recruitment. One major factor behind the lack of job candidates with disabilities could be attributed to lack of representation of disability inclusion.   Whilst there has been a growing awareness in the past year, it still doesn’t have its deserved share of voice in the broader business agenda.  It is often a forgotten aspect in this conversation – particularly when it comes to business leadership where just 4% of CEOs have a disclosed disability. The Valuable 500 is working to tackle this critical issue by promoting better ‘story telling’ by business leaders with first-hand experience of disability.

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